The Daily Post Photo Challenge : Evanescent

This challenge is wide open. Evanescent can be any fleeting moment in time. It could be the moment you drop a seed into your garden, marking that promise of new growth to come. It could be a photo of the Eastern Phoebe that visits your deck each day, wagging her tail as she calls her own name. If you’re in the Southern Hemisphere, it could be that carpet of leaves that fell overnight, before the wind scatters them. It might be the moment you light the first fire of Fall.

Clouds have always fascinated me. We see something familiar in them but that is just for a moment. They change.

Here I thought of the Eagles from Lord of the Rings 🙂

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The light from behind those eyes 🙂

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The sun and the clouds playing hide and seek 🙂

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The Daily Post Photo Challenge : Evanescent

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The World of Violence (Slice Of Life)

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“Will there ever be peace in this world?” asked my husband when we heard about the Manchester Arena bomb attack. We said no. It was really tragic to say that but it seems as if violence has become a norm. Thoughts of all those terror attacks that had destroyed life came to mind. Such attacks not only destroy lives but also instil fear in the minds of people: the fear whether they would return home in the evening. It is unfortunate that violence has always been a part of human life.

I have just finished reading Kohinoor : The Story of the World’s Most Infamous Diamond, by William Dalrymple and Anita Anand. It is a very interesting book because the authors have brought that long-ago world alive. This is the story of the Kohinoor, how it came to India and how it left the country. Every few pages, I had to put the book down. The brutal violence and human greed was difficult to take in. Through the years rulers tortured and killed to take possession of the diamond. What is that fascination in precious gems that drives people to murder? I remember the book Cat among the Pigeons by Agatha Christie. This novel is also about gems, their fascination and violence that follows them. Christie writes abou­­t the emotions of the school girl when she sees them, ‘the girl became a woman at that moment when she gazed at the precious gems for the first time.’ Such is the power of all those precious stones.

Writing about violence I recall an article which I read many years ago. It was by Swami Visharadananda in the magazine Vedanta Kesari. The author states that physical violence is the worst and grossest form of violence. But violence can also be verbal and mental. They are equally hurtful. Many a time we speak without thinking. We do not care about the feelings of others. Some people are so used to looking at negative points that they do not even realize what they are doing. It is rightly said, “A mind which is busy thinking of other’s faults is like a housefly looking for a wound and relishing it.” The author writes further, “In order to practice verbal non-violence, we should remember that it is not easy to heal others’ hurt feelings, but to hurt others is easy.” Speaking ill of others in their absence is also verbal violence. If we keep thinking ill of others, sometime or the other it comes out- through words or actions.  First it is a mere idea, if we do not check it, it slowly assumes greater form and intensity.

William Blake has expressed the same idea so beautifully in his poem, A poison Tree.

I was angry with my friend:

I told my wrath, my wrath did end.

I was angry with my foe:

I told it not, my wrath did grow.

And I watered it in fears,

Night and morning with my tears;

And I sunned it with smiles,

And with soft deceitful wiles.

And it grew both day and night,

Till it bore an apple bright.

And my foe beheld it shine.

And he knew that it was mine,

And into my garden stole

When the night had veiled the pole;

In the morning glad I see

My foe outstretched beneath the tree.

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Humans with Earth Movers slowly killing Mother Earth.

The World of Violence (Slice Of Life)

 

 

The Daily Post Photo Challenge : Heritage

This week, share a photo of something that says “heritage” to you. It can be from your own family or culture — a library, a work of public art, a place of worship, an object passed down to you from previous generations. Or, like me, you can choose to focus on a tradition to which you don’t belong, but to which you’ve been exposed whether through travel, moving, or the people in your life.

“Trees are  heritage

Inherited from the past

Leave to the future.”

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Hyderabad 22nd Jan to 25th Jan 2016 (25)

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RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #149 Excite&Karma

(Most of us believe in the doctrines of Karma and reincarnation. For most Hindus, life and death are like two sides of the same coin. According to the laws of Karma we reap the fruits of our actions, performed in this life or in former lives. Every deed has an effect. – From HINDUISM, Frequently asked questions)

 “Some are excited

 To know what the future holds.

 Either good or bad,

 We face all that comes our way

 We believe it is Karma.”

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RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #149 Excite&Karma

 

Good or Bad ? (Slice of Life)

 

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The other day I faced a situation when my mindset about someone was changed when I had to compare their attitude with that of someone else. It happens so often. We form an opinion, usually it is not a good opinion, and then a situation arises when we discover that our opinion was mistaken. Most of us change our opinions over the course of time. We make comparisons about people or places or things and keep asking ourselves, “good or bad, better or worse?” Thinking about comparisons, my mind went back many years in time. Some of us were conversing with my husband’s aunt. She passed away last month at the age of 86. She was a very gentle soul, one of the sweetest persons I have known

She grew in the first half of the 20th century in a hamlet as part of a joint family. People of our community were usually agriculturists. They had settled down in valleys were there was a good supply of water. Agriculturists in my country depend a lot on monsoons for all agricultural activities. Parents, their sons, their wives and children and other relatives all lived under a single roof.

My father-in-law used to say people in the villages were very self-sufficient. The members of the family had to work very hard. It is very difficult for us to imagine that life. It was a patriarchal society. Girls studied only till they completed primary school. Then they got married. They had to live according to the customs and traditions of their house. There was very little scope for them to go against those rules. The family was important, not the individual. A cousin used to say most girls never got the opportunity to discover their talents or even express them. Household work and other chores kept them busy from morning to night. As I mentioned above, families were extremely large then.

We were talking about how girls and women of the family managed during their monthly periods. They had stay away from other people. Very often they used to sit in a separate room. In a way, those days were a period of rest for them, a break from their household duties. But they had to work outside the house. Maybe it was difficult for them to sit idle. Such a situation seems very strange to us. We are used to having time for ourselves, to follow our own interests. We do have house work but this is not time consuming. Moreover we no longer have large, extended families living together in our part of the country. We remarked to my husband’s aunt that life must have been very difficult for them. She said, “We did not think it was difficult because we knew only that life. Everybody lived the same way. We never compared because there was nothing to compare our lives with. Of course there were difficulties in life. Life was difficult due to the existing conditions and not because we looked at the lives of others and compared.” Her words made so much sense. There was wisdom in those words. They have always been a part of my life.

I remember reading these words long ago, but I don’t remember whose words they are: “Never judge a person by standing in your shoes because your problems are different from their problems. You will be able to understand that person only when you stand in that person’s shoes.”

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(This photo was taken by my father-in-law’s younger brother in early 1950s. He took the photo from inside a tunnel in a hillside, between two fields.)

Good or Bad ? (Slice of Life)

The Daily Post Photo Challenge : Reflecting

From water and glass to metallic surfaces, share a photo that captures something reflected back to you in a way that made you look at your surroundings differently. I look forward to seeing your reflections!

One Sunday morning we decided to go to see a Jain Basadi in a small hamlet called Varanga, about an hour’s drive from our place. There are three ancient ‘basadis’ or Jain temples in this place. Neminatha Basadi is about 1200 years old, Chandranatha Basadi about 1000 years old. The main attraction here is Kerebasadi which is set in the middle of a beautiful lake. Kere means lake in our language, Kannada. Actually the best time to visit the place is after the monsoon season and the lake is full. We have go across in a boat to the centre and the mountains are a backdrop. The basadi is beautifully simple. This temple is more than 900 years old.

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The beach is one of our favourite places 🙂 The reflection of the sun on the sands and the waves adds beauty to the day. 🙂

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And on the lake in our place 🙂

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The Daily Post Photo Challenge : Reflecting