Letter from Home-7 (Slice of Life)

slice-of-life_individual
[I remember those long ago days when we used to write letters to our near and dear ones regularly. Over the years there have been lot of changes in life. These are the days of the internet and we have stopped writing letters. Last year I started writing mails to my mother and my Doddamma (my father’s elder brother’s wife) She lives with her son and family. My cousin’s wife shows her my mails. My mother lives with my brother and my sister-in-law shows her my mails. My Doddamma is 86 and is not able to go out. My Amma and Doddamma enjoy the mails and the photos. The internet has really changed our lives, it helps us to keep some contact with our friends and relatives, if we want to😊. I am editing a few lines before posting in Slice of Life because it would be difficult to understand without knowing the details. I am also adding links to certain topics of interest.]

6-03-18
Dear Doddamma and amma,
I think I have told you that I go to Asare, home for the mentally challenged three times a week. I go in the afternoons and have been going there for the last six years. The teachers and those who can, make flowers from organdie and stocking material. I learnt how to make them and help by cutting the materials and making petals and tying them to make roses. These are bought by different colleges and the Rotary. On the 2nd was Holi, I joined in the Holi celebrations. It was fun.

20180302_143618

That morning I made rice kheer (a dessert)at home. A cousin gave me the recipe. We have take ½ glass rice, 1 glass sugar, 4 glasses of milk, little cashew nuts and cook everything together in the cooker for 15 minutes. The kheer is ready and very tasty and it gets a light brown colour because of the sugar. It is easy to make.

There is a Nagavana near our house. Ten years ago the Naga stones were again established and a small temple was built. On the 3rd was the 10th year celebration. Chandika homa and Ashelsha bali (rituals connected with the worship of Snake God) was performed.

IMG_20180303_115534

( Mandala made by the priests )

Aravinda and I went at 8 o’clock as he had to go to college. I asked one of our elderly neighbours about these Naga stones. He is more than 80 years old. He said they have been here since his father’s younger days. They may have been there much before that. His family have been offering puja to the Naga stones. They were under a very old jackfruit tree. Shiroor Matha of Lord Krishna temple owned the land all around here, About 15 years ago they cut the old tree. I really do not understand how they could cut the tree. At the same time trees all around were also cut down and now there is a concrete jungle in its place. It is really tragic. No puja was offered for three or four years and the Naga stones fell from their places. This was thought to be a bad sign. After consulting the elders of the place it was decided that all the people of this area should get together and build a temple in the Nagavana and re-establish the Naga stones. This was done and every year on that day pujas are offered and lunch for all devotees. That afternoon about thousand people ate in the premises of the Nagavana.

The same night there was a Yakshagana programme. It started at about 9.30 and finished at about 5 in the morning. It was held in the open ground near our house. The Maranakatte Mela performed Maranakatte Kshetra Mahime. According to the local legend Devi Mookambike killed the Mookasura here and later performed the Marana Homa. Maranakatte is a small town about 16 kms from Kundapura. It is famous for its Brahmalingeshwara temple. Kuvara (my husband) watched till about 11.30. Chairs had been kept in the field and the whole place was full. Many stayed up till the end and some left after midnight.

130203yakshagana12

( This photo is from the internet, it is of the same group who had performed near our house.)

Amma, the bags which you have stitched are very beautiful. I have kept aside four blouse pieces. ( my mother is stitching small bags and enjoying herself) I will get them when I come to see you.

IMG-20180305-WA0000
With love,
Lakshmi

Yakshagana – Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakshagana
Yakshamitra founded in 2008 in Toronto, Canada, is the first full pledged Yakshagana mela outside India. … Maranakatte mela: still performing: Sri Brahmalingeshwara Temple: B: Donation, Devotee: Mandarthi Mela: 1950s: still performing: Durgaparameswari Temple: B: Devotees’ donation: Keremane Mela: B: Bappanadu …

Nagaradhane – Wikipedia
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nagaradhane
Nagaradhane (Tulu: ನಾಗಾರಾಧನೆ) is a form of snake worship which, along with Bhuta Kola, is one of the unique traditions prevalent in Coastal districts of Dakshina Kannada, Udupi and Kasaragod alternatively known as Tulu Nadu, practiced by Tuluva community members.

Maranakatte – Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maranakatte
Maranakatte is located at a distance of 16 km from Kundapura on the way to Kollur and the village is also called Kanchinakodlu. There is a Brahmalingeshwara Temple which is located on the banks of river Brahmakunda in the northside which then takes a steep turn towards east which increases the beauty of the spot.

Mandala – Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandala

A mandala (Sanskrit: मण्डल, maṇḍala; literally “circle”) is a spiritual and ritual symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism, representing the universe. In common use, “mandala” has become a generic term for any diagram, chart or geometric pattern that represents the cosmos metaphysically or symbolically; a microcosm of the universe.

Letter from Home-7 (Slice of Life)

Advertisements

10 Replies to “Letter from Home-7 (Slice of Life)”

  1. YES, my eyes were drawn to the bright, beautiful colors, too — thank you for taking the time to include pictures in this Slice! And what a lovely letter/story to share and help us understand the traditions of this celebration — thank you!

  2. Love your post! Thank you for the insight into your cultural heritage. I agree with the above slicer–this would make a great book–maybe even a children’s book with all that color.

  3. How refreshing to be invited into your family’s traditions and celebrations about which I otherwise would have no idea. You welcome the reader in your introduction and the warmth in your letters allows a stranger to listen along and observe the elements you describe.

  4. I really enjoy the glimpse you offer of your life and your culture.I can’t imagine myself staying up all night to watch something. Truly fascinating.

  5. So interesting that you have a colourful spiritual life. You’re lucky to have culture, art and religion brought to you. And I am going to try your kheer recipe some day soon. Greetings. San

    1. Thank you 😊 the cousin who gave this recipe to me said that she had tried it her daughter’s home in USA and the rice just would not get cooked in the milk available there.

Comments are welcome :)

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s