SoCS Aug. 27, 2022

Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “board/bored.” Use one, or use them both for bonus points. Enjoy!

Some years ago, my mother told me about a board game her grandmother loved to play. On reading Linda’s prompt, I asked my mother about it. She remembered and narrated to me her memories. My mother is in that stage of life when she forgets many incidents and people. But she remembers her childhood clearly.

Her grandmother’s name was Mukambike. She was the first wife of my mother’s grandfather. Even after a few years they did not have any children. Her grandfather married his wife’s niece as   his second wife. They had two children, my grandfather and his sister. This lady passed away at young age and her children were brought up by Mukambike. My mother called her Bobbe ajji. Maybe she could not pronounce her grandmother’s name.

She was a very enterprising lady. In the months of March and April she went to the homes of relatives and helped them to make jackfruit papads. As a token of appreciation, they gave her a share of the dried snacks. She was a medicine woman too. She helped the people in her village with her knowledge of medicinal herbs and concoctions. This was in the 1940s.

She was an expert player of a board game called Daabelu. It was played with cowrie shells. She went to her uncle’s house with three others after completing the days’ work. One half of the coconut shell was polished to smoothness and placed upside down on the floor. The floor was divided into four houses with chalk. Each player shook six shells in their hands and dropped them on the curved surface of the coconut shell. If the cowrie shells fell with their humped surfaces up, the player won a certain number points. If they fell the other way round the points were different. They played this game for hours after nightfall; in the light of the oil lamp. They were never bored of the game.

It is interesting that board games are etched on the stone floors of many temples. We saw them in the temples of the Hoysala period in Belur and Halebidu. When I saw them, I imagined those long ago days. Temples were not only places of worship. They played an important role in the daily life of people. And how can I forget the infamous  game of dice in the Mahabharata? Generations have come and gone but board games remain.

Our grandchildren enjoy board games like Snakes and Ladders, Ludo and Monopoly. We too played them long back. A few years ago, Advaith was explaining how to play Monopoly to my mother. In the course of the game, he learnt that she had been to different continents. The only place she had not been to was the jail. I heard him asking her if she had ever gone to jail. She laughed and told him no one had sent her there😊.

Chowka bhara – Wikipedia Daabelu

Snakes and ladders – Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snakes_and_ladders
Halebidu – Wikipedia

Chennakeshava Temple, Belur – Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chennakeshava_Temple,_Belur

Mahabharat Game of Dice – Why Did Pandavas Play?

https://isha.sadhguru.org/in/en/wisdom/article/mahabharat-dice-game

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By Lakshmi Bhat

I am a person who believes there is not enough darkness in the world to extinguish the light of a small candle. We live in a small place in South India. I love reading, blogging, stitching, traveling, photography, listening to people and many other things which make life so very nice and interesting. Blogging is a fun experience, it has brought me into contact with people in different parts of the world and it is good to read about their everyday life. In spite of the differences there is a sameness which is fascinating. I have learnt and am learning something everyday. I have learnt to write haikus. I enjoy combining the thought and the number of syllables. I have always read books and I was happy to write short fiction. I had thought I would not be able to do so. Stream of Consciousness and photo challenges are fun too. Yes, there is so much in life that is sad and that hurts us. Many a time I wonder why life is so unfair to so many. We all have problems in life but the problems of many seems unbearable. This makes me feel so helpless. It is not possible to help everyone but we can do our bit, we can do something to help some in whatever way we can. Due to the pandemic I could not go to the Home for the mentally challenged for two years. I had been going there since 2011. I have started going again. I was happy that some members remembered me :) All of them are an important part of my life. There have been many challenges in life and we have faced them with a positive approach. Our grandson and granddaughter have made our lives richer.

13 comments

  1. Mukambike Ajji must have been loud mouthed,talkative…bobbe in Havyaka means to shout…
    Very interesting character ..Bobbe Ajji,enterprising too!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Your post evokes the chains of the generations . This may put us dizzy .! So many generations to give birth to Lakshmi.! 🙂
    in the ancien time there was no Tv nor internet and people gathered to play board games . I knew this time in the years 1930-1940
    Passing time ! 🙂
    Love ❤
    Michel

    Liked by 1 person

  3. It is good that your mother has happy memories of an earlier time. I am fascinated by your mention of Mahabharata, the longest poem ever written. There are so many things I know very little of, and not enough time to learn as much as I would like to.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Such a sweet representation of life force in each generation of your family :):) Also, interesting to know about “Daabelu “ —personally feel these board games connects people from heart to heart; despite diversities.

    Liked by 1 person

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